Stop letting side projects sit around on your hard drive.

You sit down to start on your next side project, full of energy and enthusiasm. You're excited; starting something new is an opportunity to make something great. Your project starts out simple but, over time, becomes unmanageable. You add a new feature here, a new design there. Until, eventually, your perfect little side project becomes something else entirely.

Frustration sets in

Later, with a huge list of tasks to complete and no sign of launch day on the horizon, your energy fades. You start giving up. Working on your side project stops being fun. You aren't learning anything new; you're just trying to finish the damn thing.

It's a cycle of failure

And, if you don't change your approach, it's one you'll repeat time and time again. Take heart; you aren't alone. This is a struggle as old as time itself. When I talk to developers about why they're struggling to ship their side projects, I see the same issues crop up almost every time

You can break the cycle

You don't become a master painter overnight. You start by painting something small. Taking a class and learning the basics. Practice, practice, practice. Like painting, shipping is a skill that can be learned and practiced, like any other.

Start practicing

In the last few years, I've released more than ten side projects while working full-time. In this free, 5-part email course — titled 5 Side Project Mistakes Developers Make — I share some of the lessons I've learned. It won't teach you everything you need to know but, whether you're working on your first side project or just your latest, I know you'll find it valuable.

Let's do this

Drop your email in the form below to get started.

Email Courses

Once the course is over, I'll send you a weekly email about shipping side projects, being more productive, and doing your best work. No spam, all love.

 
 
 

What you'll learn

  • Defining the purpose behind your side project.
  • How to cut scope until you have a solid vision for your first version.
  • Why it's important to work on your project each and every day.
  • When to think about monetizing your project.
  • Why developers struggle to just ship something.